Cartier, Paris, Tiger Clip Brooch, 1957, gold, single-and brilliant-cut diamonds ranging from fancy intense yellow to near colorless, marquise-shaped emeralds, and fancy-shaped onyxes. Nick Welsh, Cartier Collection, © Cartier

Cartier, Paris, Tiger Clip Brooch, 1957, gold, single-and brilliant-cut diamonds ranging from fancy intense yellow to near colorless, marquise-shaped emeralds, and fancy-shaped onyxes. Nick Welsh, Cartier Collection, © Cartier

I promise this blog isn't going to be all Cartier and Apple all the time. (Actually… I'm cool with it if you are.)

Cartier's pretty proactive in terms of branding. I've always been interested to see their new projects. Unfortunately their work is precariously inconsistent -- inconsistency being the antithesis of branding! 

Here's a look at some of Cartier's recent moves to market its brand.

The Good: 

More emphasis on their identity as "Jewellers of Kings, King of Jewellers." I'm not surprised that it's done well in the China campaigns. Really simple, really great writing. I've always loved that bit of copy, and earnestly felt that whoever came up with that bit of genius ought to be promoted. Found out it was King Edward VII way back when. And I'm sure he didn't work for Cartier (; Proof that the best things in life are free (:

The Bad: 

A typo on Cartier's Pinterest page. This depresses me. A typo on Cartier's part is almost as bad as (Yves) Saint Laurent's TWEETING IN ALL CAPS ALL THE TIME ALL THE YELLING!!

Transient


The Ugly:

Cartier's lovestory video, aimed at the Chinese market.

I could dissect this for days, but here are 3 points:

  1. In China, the "western marriage proposal" isn't done. The common practice is to ask for the girl's hand from the family, then he takes his beloved to the jeweller so that she can choose whatever her heart desires. Not sure why Cartier either (1) didn't do enough market research or (2) decided to keep this discrepancy.
  2. Disgustingly shallow storyline and writing, and low-budget videography. 
  3. I'm not Chinese, but as an Asian-American woman, this video makes me feel weird and uncomfortable. The video is insulting to it's target audience. (I even found out that one commenter wrote in Chinese "the brand should do some deep thinking and take the insulting video offline.")

Typically, I fall in love with the product first and then become interested in the brand. After that point, it's hand-in-hand. 

But considering Cartier's repertoire of hit and miss brand management lately, I've got to say we're entering an unprecedented relationship where I love the products but feel disappointed at the brand work. 

I feel like it's all dishonoring the Cartier craftsmen, the backbone of Cartier, who continue to produce such beautiful, unimitable jewellery.